Juu Life Ni
Kujipanga

Our lives are in our hands. We’ve got to be responsible for our sexual and reproductive health. What is sexual and reproductive health?

The exercise of control over one’s sexual and reproductive health linked to human rights and includes the right to:

  • Reproductive health as a component of overall health, throughout the life cycle, for both men and women;
  • Reproductive decision-making, including voluntary choice in marriage, family formation and determination of the number, timing and spacing of one’s children and the right to have access to the information and means needed to exercise voluntary choice;
  • Equality and equity for men and women, to enable individuals to make free and informed choices in all spheres of life, free from discrimination based on gender; and
  • Sexual and reproductive security, including freedom from sexual violence and coercion, and the right to privacy.
Choices are everyone’s life journey. Question is, which choices will you make?

Contraception – Choice ni yako!

Contraception is the intentional prevention of pregnancy through the use of various devices, sexual practices, hormones, or surgical procedures. Make an informed choice!

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The Vaginal Ring is a flexible ring that contains progestin hormone and is inserted into the vagina to prevent pregnancy in actively breastfeeding mothers.

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Emergency ContraceptionClick for details

Can be used if unprotected sex has taken place or when another method of contraception has failed

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Male CondomsClick for details

A thin, latex rubber sheath made to fit a man’s erect penis.

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Female CondomsClick for details

Made of thin transparent, polyurethane pre-lubricated with a silicone-based substance.

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AbstinenceClick for details

Choosing not to have sex.

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Withdrawal MethodClick for details

Also called coitus interruptus or Pull-out method

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Where a woman tracks and knows how to tell when the fertile time of her monthly cycle starts and ends.

See all methods  ›

The pill works primarily by preventing the release of eggs from ovaries (ovulation).

Hormonal contraceptive methods

POPs work by preventing the release of eggs from ovaries and thickening the cervical mucus

Hormonal contraceptive methods

They are given by injection of the progestin into the muscle or under the skin.

Hormonal contraceptive methods

Progestin-only Contraceptive Implants are commonly referred to as “Implants”

Hormonal contraceptive methods

The Vaginal Ring is a flexible ring that contains progestin hormone and is inserted into the vagina to prevent pregnancy in actively breastfeeding mothers.

Hormonal contraceptive methods

Can be used if unprotected sex has taken place or when another method of contraception has failed

Hormonal contraceptive methods

A small device made with copper that is inserted into the uterine cavity to prevent pregnancy for upto
12years

Intrauterine Contraceptive devices

A small flexible plastic device that is inserted into the uterine cavity to prevent pregnancy for three to as
long as five years.

Intrauterine Contraceptive devices

A voluntary surgical procedure to provide permanent pregnancy protection.

Voluntary surgical methods

Surgical process of cutting or tying the 2 tubes that carry sperms to the penis to prevent spermatozoa from mixing with seminal fluid

Voluntary surgical methods

A thin, latex rubber sheath made to fit a man’s erect penis.

Barrier methods

Made of thin transparent, polyurethane pre-lubricated with a silicone-based substance.

Barrier methods

Choosing not to have sex.

Others

Also called coitus interruptus or Pull-out method

Others

LAM is based on the natural effect of breastfeeding on temporarily stopping ovulation (fertility).

Others

Where a woman tracks and knows how to tell when the fertile time of her monthly cycle starts and ends.

Others

Youth friendly health
facility IKO karibu

Get information, advice and treatment from health centres near you for an informed choice.
Remember:

  • Services are free and affordable
  • Healthcare workers are professionals and friendly
  • It’s a youth friendly zone

Tembelea hosi/kituo cha afya kilicho karibu na home.

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FAQs

It depends on the type of pill. Most pills work across a 28 day cycle including the pill-free or placebo interval, which means you have one pack for each cycle. With some you have to take a hormonal pill every day. With others you take a hormonal pill every day for 21 or 24 or even 26 days of the cycle, and then have a hormone free break of seven or four or only two days where either no pills are taken or a hormone free pill is taken. During this break, you will still be protected and you will have a menstruation-like bleed.

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No. There is no evidence that taking a “rest” is helpful. In fact, taking a “rest” from COCs can lead to unintended pregnancy. COCs can safely be used for many years without having to stop taking them periodically.

Not always. Researchers have not found a direct link between using hormonal birth control and gaining weight. Every hormone method can affect you differently.1

Yes, she does not need to wait until 6 weeks postpartum. POPs are safe for both the mother and the baby and do not affect milk production.1

Yes. There is no minimum or maximum age for POP use.

No. There may be a delay in regaining fertility after stopping progestin- only injectables, but in time the woman will be able to become pregnant as before, although fertility decreases as women get older.

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Last modified: April, 2022

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