Male voluntary surgical contraception (Vasectomy)

Vasectomy is a permanent method of pregnancy prevention for men. In this method, the man takes responsibility for contraception therefore takes the burden off women.

How the method works

  • It is the surgical process of cutting or tying the 2 tubes that carry sperms to the penis in order to prevent spermatozoa from mixing with seminal fluid.
  • Consequently, when ejaculation occurs, the seminal fluid will not have any sperm.

Common Vasectomy Techniques

  • There are scalpel and non-scalpel vasectomy techniques.

Effectiveness

  • Vasectomy is more than 99% effective.
  • There is a delay of about 3 months in effectiveness after the procedure has been performed. Couples are therefore advised to use condoms during this period.

Advantages

  • It is important to note that a vasectomy procedure is virtually irreversible and can be done only by a trained and skilled health provider.
  • It is considered permanent providing a lifelong protection
  • Does not interfere with the act of sexual intercourse
  • The man takes responsibility for contraception

Limitations

  • With a vasectomy, one may experience minimal risks and side effects of anesthesia, as well as pain and any general risks associated with surgical procedures.
  • It is important to note that a vasectomy procedure is virtually irreversible and can be done only by a trained and skilled health provider.
  • Does not protect against HIV infection (AIDS) and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs)

Juu life ni kujipanga!

Popular questions

You will get a small injection on your arm to numb you. This means you won’t feel pain at all during insertion. There will be a little pain or soreness as the wound heals for about a week.
Yes. A woman who has not had children generally can use an IUD, but she should understand that the IUD is more likely to come out because her uterus may be smaller than the uterus of a woman who has given birth.
Yes. If needed, ECPs can be taken again, even in the same cycle. A woman who needs ECPs often may want to consider a longer-acting and more effective family planning method
Yes. A woman who has not had children generally can use an IUD, but she should understand that the IUD is more likely to come out because her uterus may be smaller than the uterus of a woman who has given birth.
No. Most research finds no major changes in bleeding patterns after female sterilization. If a woman was using a hormonal method or IUD before sterilization, her bleeding pattern will return to the way it was before she used these methods

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Last modified: April, 2022

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